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  1. The recent Warhammer Age of Sigmar Grand Tournament Final saw the best players from across the Mortal Realms battle it out at Warhammer World to be crowned the Age of Sigmar Grand Champion. The Warhammer World events team have collated all the data from the armies in attendance. If you’re interested in the trends, the top lists and the popular units, then have a read of our Age of Sigmar Grand Tournament breakdown. It’s worth noting that this data is only from the Grand Final. Whilst this consists of the top 90 players who attended the Grand Tournament, it is still a specific cross-section of Age of Sigmar gaming. With this in mind, it’s important not to draw too many conclusions from the data herein. In reality, there’s nothing quite like knowing the game really well and fully understanding your army. The fact that the event was won by a unique Mixed Order army is a great example of this – nothing beats a good, knowledgeable general with a sound plan and a bit of luck! First of all we have the breakdown of Grand Alliances: At 39 players Order leads the field, with Chaos in second. Worth noting that Order and Chaos respectively have a greater selection of warscrolls and allegiances – there are more units and armies to choose from in these grand alliances. Despite an Order player winning the event, and Order having the most players in attendance, Chaos just about beat them to the highest average score. In other words, Chaos players finished highest overall on average. We can then break down the Grand Alliances further into their allegiances. Stormcasts lead the field; fitting for Sigmar’s own! Sylvaneth are in second with 6 in total, which means fewer Sylvaneth players at the GT final than in previous heats. That’s not necessarily a reflection of Sylvaneth however. The clear indication here is that the other allegiances are catching up. Seraphon, Mixed Order and even Fyreslayers have shown considerable growth since the release of General’s Handbook 2017. With the Handbook being so recent as well, who knows what the future could bring for these armies as players come to terms with their new allegiance abilities and points adjustments. Mixed Chaos lead the field, so the Gods must be getting on with each other these days! One thing to note is that some of the Mixed Chaos armies still followed a certain theme (e.g. Khorne units), but declared for Mixed Chaos to use the allegiance abilities available to them, or to use the odd units from other allegiances that wouldn’t fall under allies ordinarily. When this happened, we have grouped them under their theme to give you a clearer indication of an army. The same can be said for Skaven. Even though they might have used a mixture of different allegiances, we have grouped them as Skaven players instead. Like Sylvaneth, there were fewer Tzeentch players at the GT final than in previous heats. Again, just like the previous Order split, this is a reflection on the other allegiances more than anything. The 3 Slaanesh players, for instance, were making use of their new abilities. Death players went one of two ways. It’s worth noting that whilst no players used the new Death allegiances of Soulblight and Nighthaunt, many discussions were taking place about their viability in the future! With the Handbook being released relatively close to the GT final, it’s hard to paint up an entirely new army in time and get practice games in, so many players were talking of the next GT season as an opportunity to bring Nagash’s minions back for some revenge! Ironjawz were going strong with 5 out of 12 Destruction players using them. The other allegiances broadly fell under Mixed Destruction, however, we’ve grouped them by theme to give you an understanding of what was being used. It’s also worth noting that whilst Beastclaw only crops up once, other allegiances still used them in some capacity such as Grots with some Beastclaw buddies! Sounds fun? Think you’ve got what it takes to represent your favourite faction? Tickets for the next season of the Warhammer Age of Sigmar Grand Tournament are on sale – pick your heat, purchase your ticket and ready your army for war. The post The Warhammer Age of Sigmar Grand Tournament: The Final Results appeared first on Warhammer Community. View the full article
  2. Death is coming from above for all who fail to join the Greater Good today, as the T’au Empire is being reinforced with a new version of the Tiger Shark. This 87-part kit contains everything you need to add this super-heavy flyer to your sept, including multiple weapons options for both the Tiger Shark itself and the drones built into its wings. There are options to have the Tiger Shark’s undercarriage detachable, to mount missile bays or drone bays, and to have missile racks open or closed – and the kit is even cleverly designed to allow you to magnetise these options and choose differently each time you use it. The Tiger Shark is a formidable addition to any T’au Empire cadre, capable of disgorging swarms of drones or firing volleys of missiles while raking the enemy with ion blasts, or it can be given heavier firepower in the form of armour-bursting swiftstrike railguns or the terrifying new long-barrelled cyclic ion blaster. Rules for the Tiger Shark can be found in Imperial Armour – Index: Xenos, with additional rules for the long-barrelled cyclic ion blaster in a handy PDF download: You can order your Tiger Shark now from Forge World, and for a limited time, every order will receive a set of Air Caste Ground Crew as well, perfect for creating a scenic diorama, or perhaps using as objective markers in your T’au Empire force. The post The Tiger Shark returns to duty appeared first on Warhammer Community. View the full article
  3. Blood & Glory isn’t just about competitive gaming – there’s also a range of events available for players that prefer narrative gaming. We caught up with organiser Greg to check out the results of his narrative even, and the final destiny of the Mal-Raen system! The first Blood & Glory Horus Heresy event is over; 24 players fighting over 2 days to help decide the fate of Coloranth VI in the Mal-Raen System. As an event organiser, I had a blast – meeting old friends, meeting new people who will hopefully become friends, and having the chance to experience a little bit of everyone’s excitement as they completed that highly unlikely charge or somehow survived the blistering fire of the enemy’s artillery. Thankfully, from the feedback, it seems the players had almost as good a time as I did, which is always the primary target I aim for. In most tournaments, the matchups of players is decided by a Swiss-style scoring method, which should result in players facing off against those who have roughly the same record for that event. This is a pretty good way of finding who is ‘the best’ player in attendance, and in theory, it also allows people to play against opponents of roughly similar skill. In reality, this takes a few games to really even out, and even then it can be skewed by a large number of variables. What I try to do with narrative Horus Heresy events is encourage the players to aim for an army that will be fun to play with and against. I do this by offering no individual prizes for winning games and by giving bonuses to armies based on the narrative as it plays out on the battlefield. At previous events I have run, the scenarios have been set before the event and the story of the results has been built to fit into them as things happen. For the first time, I decided to allow the outcome to determine the narrative, and I think it worked. The loyalist forces were on the front foot based on the First Blood event which led into this one, and so when they won the first game of Blood & Glory, the second scenario was based around the traitor forces retreating in a disorganised fashion as they were hounded by the forces of the Emperor. This appeared to work well; thankfully the campaign books from Forge World contain a lot of different scenarios, which provide different tactical challenges and portray a very thematic conflict, which is perfect for an event like this. This is definitely something I will continue to experiment with at future events. The final major aspect for review was also a major piece of feedback from the players, and that is for even more narrative. This was the one area that I knew I wouldn’t achieve on the level I had initially hoped to, and although it was fine to provide a rundown of the previous game and the setup for the next, future events can and will feature more integration with players’ armies. Extra information from maps, specific objectives which affect future games, and more tailored battlefields will all provide deeper immersion in the unfolding narrative. The best part of the whole weekend was, as always, the players themselves. When you have a group of people who smile even when things are going against them, look to resolve any issue by finding the answer that works best for all parties, and who will actively seek to help each other out, it makes being in charge so much easier. Additionally, the standard of painting was really high – we were blessed by some really talented hobbyists, but everyone in attendance had put a lot of effort into their army, and that really helps players to get immersed in the story. Before I finish, I want to share some details of the armies and the winners of the awards. The following is a breakdown of armies in attendance: Talons of the Emperor (Legio Custodes) x3 Thousand Sons x3 Ultramarines x3 World Eaters x3 Imperial Fists x2 Mechanicum x2 Space Wolves x2 Alpha Legion x1 Emperor’s Children x1 Iron Warriors x1 Raven Guard x1 Salamanders x1 Solar Auxilia x1 The Primarch of the XVth Legion, Magnus, appeared twice (obviously different shards), with his brothers Corax, Russ and Guilliman leading their own forces while various Lords of War were unleashed upon each side. The ‘Best’ Traitor was awarded to Tom Whitbrook, who led Russ against anyone who appeared to be acting as a traitor. It is unfortunate that he may have been working off unreliable information. In reality, Tom stepped up when I desperately needed a loyalist to change sides and was a thoroughly nice chap all weekend. The ‘Best’ Loyalist was Chris Mills, whose Talons of the Emperor were given all the toughest matchups, some in which he was the underdog due to extra rules, but did so with a smile on his face and never a word of complaint. Best Painted was Rob Ing’s lovely Vlka Fenryka force with a gorgeous Cerastus Knight-Castigator. This was chosen by an independent Games Workshop staff member. The final and most important award was for Best Sport, which was awarded to Aaron Tunney with his Thousand Sons. Aaron was the top choice for Best Sport from each of his opponents, which is a big achievement and a testament to the way he approaches the game. Thanks, Greg! We’re looking forward to seeing how the narrative of your campaign develops in next year’s Blood & Glory. If you’re looking to start your own narrative campaigns in the Horus Heresy, you’ll need some Space Marines to do it with, and the Betrayal and Calth and The Burning of Prospero boxed sets are a fantastic way to get your hands on some. The post The Horus Heresy at Blood & Glory Conclusion appeared first on Warhammer Community. View the full article
  4. Matched play in Warhammer Age of Sigmar is built on six battleplans, and having a strategy for each is just as important as building a powerful army or reading up on your opponents. In the first instalment of Battleplan Tactica, we’ve got legendary competitive Warhammer Age of Sigmar player Russ “the Face” Veal to take us through how to deliver a Knife to the Heart of your enemy without taking one yourself… Knife to the Heart is one of the hardest battleplans to secure a major victory and requires a well-thought-out plan from the outset. Key points to consider: The game can be won or lost from battle round 3 onwards. You need 5 models within 6″ of both objectives, and no enemy models in that space, to win. If neither player wins the major victory, the win will come down to kill points. Units can be within 18″ of each other at the start of the game. Setting a plan for the game When approaching this battleplan you need to decide if you can play for the major or the minor victory. This will depend largely on the type of force you have selected. Remember that in order to effectively attack your opponent’s objective, you will need to keep enough back to stop any fast enemy units or units with special deployment rules from getting around your flanks/attacking force. The diagonal deployment zones can make covering your objective very difficult, especially against special deployment rules such as the Stormcast Lightning Strike ability. Plan 1 – Minor Victory through Ranged Attacks This is probably one of the easiest plans to execute, but you need to be able to outrange your opponent’s abilities and shooting attacks. For example, if you have Judicators and Vanguard-Raptors with longstrike crossbows, but your opponent is using short-range spells for ranged damage or a Kunnin Ruk. In this case, you should be able to plan your range and shoot with little to no returning fire from them. Using your superior range and keeping track of your kill points during the game will really help here. You still need a strong defensive force to protect your objective or use the combat threat to keep enemy units away. You can also use a resilient attacking unit to keep them occupied whilst you pick off enough points from afar to take the minor victory by round 5. Plan 2 – The Bait and Switch Using units which your opponent needs to kill, but which you don’t fully commit, can make your opponent overextend, moving their troops off the objective. This can weaken their defensive force and leave them open to a sneaky counter-attack on the objective. Of course, you need to capitalise on this early or they can sweep back in and put you on the back foot. This strategy can also lure an opponent into an attack on a weak-looking centre, allowing your fast units to flank and clear the units left behind, claiming their home objective. However, you also need to keep them away from your own objective using a large and sturdy defensive unit; you can’t go wrong with a block of 30 or so Dryads. Fast-moving armies such as Sylvaneth are really effective at this strategy, using the superior movement to pull the opponent out of position. Plan 3 – The Counter-Attack This plan is all about effectively shutting down your opponent’s attacking force and quickly eliminating it, before pushing through to claim their objective. Having one special deployment unit is great for this, as you can use them to attack the objective whilst your main force repels your opponent’s assault. You’ll want to hold 10 Vanguard-Hunters off the board for this purpose, thanks to their versatility, possessing both ranged and close-combat attacks. If your opponent is playing very aggressively, with lots of close combat units, you can play around them by letting them come to you. Play carefully, hope they score a double turn and strand themselves in the middle of the board, then bring in your counter-attack units from the back to drag them back. Plan 4 – Overwhelming Force This is a very straightforward plan, but is very hard to execute – armies like Ironjawz and Soulblight really excel at this plan. The goal here is to try and get the double turn between rounds 2 and 3 so you can automatically win on the end of your third turn after taking two turns back-to-back. You need to play accordingly; try and hold back, let your opponent play tentatively in early turns, then to push hard in turns 2 to 3 with enough combat superiority to attack effectively. By being patient, you also reduce the chance of a successful counter-attack if your attacking force is wiped out; while your opponent might pick up the minor victory, they won’t have time to rout your defences and take that second objective. This approach is very effective if your opponent has weaker combat army and they push early. Be wary of armies with flanking and special deployment units. Defensive shooting armies also dislike this approach and you may need to be more aggressive early on. While your rearguard should be under little to no threat, again be wary of fast-moving units such as Vanguard-Palladors and Tzaangor Skyfires. One thing to bear in mind is to keep back enough units to have 5 models around your objective. Top Tips for Protecting your Objective Protecting your objective effectively will require spreading out multiple small units or single characters at the max 6″ range spread out around the objective to hold it. Maintaining the 5 model requirement here is key to winning a major victory, but also helps to deny your enemy the same. A large unit of defensive models can be used to push back and stop enemies getting around and within range. A unit of 30 Plaguebearers can comfortably sit on the objective, resist shooting and stop combat units dead in their tracks. Cheap battleline units which can regrow, like skeleton warriors or zombies, can also be great as a defensive holding force. Using aggressive units to threaten your opponent’s attacking units can be effective at deterring an attack, making your opponent think twice before pushing towards your objectives – Fulminators and Blood Knights are great for this. Putting it all together… Knife to the Heart is a battleplan which asks a lot from your army selection, so having a flexible mix of units will allow you to play any of the above strategies and counter your opponent’s plan. Understanding how your opponent will approach the game is key to winning this mission with a major victory. If the fight is on their objective and they cannot get to yours, you’re probably on the right track. Patience, a flexible army and a thought-out plan should help you emerge victorious in this mission. Thanks, Russ! If you’re looking to play Knife to the Heart, you’ll need a copy of the General’s Handbook 2017 – order yours here. The post Battleplan Tactica – Knife to the Heart appeared first on Warhammer Community. View the full article
  5. Jay Clare: Last weekend, I made the long trip south from Nottingham to East Grinstead to take part in the annual ‘Fireworks in Rivenstead’ event, run by Sam Page and Craig Harrison. Every year, Sam and Craig provide a small twist in how players build their army lists to add an extra layer of intrigue to the event. This year, army lists were to be made up to 1,000 points, and the twist was that every Hero (that was able) had to take a warband of at least three Warriors, and for each model with access to Magical Powers, all casting values increased by one! With this in mind, I took the following army: Warband 1: Wanderers in the Wild Treebeard (leader) 12 Woses Warriors Warband 2: Minas Tirith™ Madril, Captain of Ithilien 12 Guards of the Fountain Court with shield Warband 3: Minas Tirith Beregond 12 Guards of the Fountain Court with shield Warband 4: Lothlórien & Mirkwood Legolas™ 10 Galadhrim Warriors with spear & shield 1 Guard of the Galadhrim Court with banner 1 Wood Elf Sentinel Warband 5: The White Council Galadriel™, Lady of Light Game 1 – Capture and Control The first round of the event saw me paired against Strategy Battle Game veteran Mikolaj Bakalarz, and his mix of High Elves and Gondor led by Boromir, Glorfindel and Elladan & Elrohir. Both of us deployed our forces as close to the centre of the board as possible, and I immediately charged into combat with Treebeard, causing some major damage early on. The following turns saw Treebeard able to slay both of the Elven twins and, despite Boromir’s efforts in the early game, he was swamped and brought down by my force’s superior numbers. With Mik’s force broken, the game came to an end, and although he had prevented me from scoring a few key objectives, I was able to pull off a 6-2 win. Game 2 – Hold Ground In round two, I played against Jamie Giblin, a close friend and regular opponent of mine. His force comprised a mix of Wood Elves, Dwarves and Woses, all led by Thranduil™, Legolas, Ghân-buri-Ghân, Flói, along with Galadriel and Boromir. Jamie’s force reached the centre of the board first, holding up my warbands on the edge of the battlefield. Knowing I couldn’t win the race for the middle, I decided to instead focus on killing Legolas, Jamie’s leader, and his other major Heroes. Treebeard was able to slay both Legolas and Galadriel, whilst my Legolas got the better of Boromir. With this, I then marched upon the centre in force, and was able to surround and defeat Jamie’s army – sealing me a 12-1 victory! Game 3 – To the Death! The final game of day one paired me against David Reid, another regular opponent I face at events. As usual, David had brought a mix of Harad and Mordor™, but this time had added in two of the three Trolls: Bill and Bert. The game started with both sides trying to gain the upper hand with their shooting, and this saw me chip off both of The Shadow Lord’s Fate points with Legolas and Beregond. David then decided that in order to win, he needed to charge his lines forward. Fortunately for me, Legolas was able to shoot The Shadow Lord before he could cause any real damage, and Treebeard was able to slay both Trolls in relatively quick succession. From here, I managed to break David’s army and slay his banner-bearer with a well-placed Hurl from Treebeard, gaining me a 7-0 victory. Game 4 – Warganation The fourth game was a custom Scenario made by Sam, where a number of Wargs would enter from random points on the board and try to attack both sides; whoever killed the most Wargs would win – simple. I was paired against another veteran – Damian O’Byrne, who had brought with him The Necromancer, The Keeper of the Dungeons and all nine of the Nazgûl of Dol Guldur – all of which had been converted. The game was tense, with both of us killing as many Wargs as we could as quickly as possible. The Nazgûl were proving hard to deal with as they kept coming back, thanks to their Unholy Resurrection special rule, though Galadriel did manage to banish the Lingering Shadow. In the end, neither force Broke and both leaders remained unscathed, so it came down to which of us had killed the most Wargs. Damian had killed 17 whilst I, mainly thanks to Legolas and his Deadly Shot special rule, had killed 23 – giving me a 4-0 win! Game 5 – Ill met by Moonlight Round 5 paired me against Harry Moore on the top table, in what promised to be a close game. Harry’s army consisted of a mix of Elves, Hobbits and Dwarves with Merry, Pippin, Thranduil, Legolas, Flói and Elladan & Elrohir as his Heroes. Harry’s army outnumbered mine, so I needed to kill as much from range as possible. The Scenario meant that models could only see 12″, which gave me an advantage as the Woses could only shoot their blowpipes 12″ anyway. As soon as Harry’s force got into range, it was peppered with blowpipe darts, arrows and the occasional thrown rock from Treebeard, which caused a significant amount of casualties, whilst at the same time mine took very few in return. This meant that Harry’s force then had to charge into combat to try to win. As the game progressed, I managed to break Harry’s force but came dangerously close to being Broken myself. The final turn saw Harry needing to kill just three models to break my force and secure a draw but unfortunately was unable to do so as Elladan failed to kill a single Woses Warrior in the last turn, making the game finish at 8-3 to me. The game was so close and Harry was, as ever, great fun to play against, so I gave him my Favourite Game vote. Game 6 – Storm the Camp The final round paired me against David Dyson and his Last Alliance-themed force. Both armies advanced quickly towards each other, firing as many arrows as they could. Galadriel suffered two wounds at the hands of David’s bowmen, whilst Legolas was able to slay Elrond™ over the course of turns, though he did have to spend most of his Might. As David’s lines advanced, my Wood Elf Sentinel was able to lure one of David’s Warriors of Númenor forward, allowing Treebeard to charge and then Hurl his unfortunate foe through the advancing ranks of Men and Elves. With David’s army mainly knocked Prone, my force was able to cause some major casualties over the next few turns, including Gil-galad, as I broke his force and the game came to a close with me pulling off a 6-0 victory. With the event over, I had managed to win all of my games and ended up in first place! The whole weekend was fantastic, and I had a series of exciting, tactical and, above all, fun games – coming away with first place was a real honour! Congratulations also to Mikolaj Bakalarz for coming second, and Damian O’Byrne for coming in third. The post Fireworks in Rivenstead 2017 Review appeared first on Warhammer Community. View the full article
  6. Armies on Parade 2017 is over, and as usual, we’ve been blown away by the standard of entries we’ve seen from across the world. Forces from across the Mortal Realms have been on display alongside heroes of the 41st Millennium and even Blood Bowl teams, and they’ve been nothing short of spectacular. Our website team has been hard at work getting some of these new entries onto the Armies on Parade website, and the first batch of inspirational forces are there now for you to view. Check them out, and maybe you’ll be hit with an idea for next year’s Parade Day – after all, there’s less than a year to go… The post Armies on Parade: Website Update appeared first on Warhammer Community. View the full article
  7. Attention, Guardsmen! You are being stationed to Pythos IV! This world is famous across the Imperium for the [REDACTED], the historical battles of [REDACTED], the recent [REDACTED] campaign, the wildlife, and of course, [REDACTED]. To help you adjust, as well as prepare an appropriately grateful response for your superiors, the Regimental Standard has a guide on what to expect from this verdant world. Read it here: The post The Regimental Standard: Welcome To Pythos IV! appeared first on Warhammer Community. View the full article
  8. FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE Contact: Sherry Yeary, President, Privateer Press, (425) 643-5900, sherry@privateerpress.com. Privateer Press Launches New Northkin Theme Force Expansion November 8, 2017 Bellevue, WA - Privateer Press is releasing its first-ever theme force for the HORDES tabletop game this November. Theme forces are armies designed around specific military roles that allow players to field armies with a unified aesthetic and rules designed to work together well on the tabletop. The Northkin theme force delves into the relatively unexplored trollkin culture of these northern trollbloods and features 10 new models for the Faction, including all-new Northkin Raiders, a new warlock Kolgrima Stonetruth, and the massive Hearthgut Hooch Hauler. Additionally, the new Northkin Army Theme Box features the Trollkin Chieftain Valka Curseborn and the new Northkin Bear Handler & Battle Bears. Combined with the currently available Trollkin Battlegroup Starter Box, the theme box allows players to field a complete 35-point Northkin army. “Since the beginning of HORDES, the Trollbloods have been a proud and determined people, standing firm and stoic in the face of grim adversity,” Executive Director William Shick said. “However, while the Northkin also face the same struggle for survival as their better-known southern kin, these alcohol-swigging, battle-loving, fiery Trollbloods present a wholly different outlook and lust for life. Rather than face the constant warfare surrounding them with grim determination, they actually revel in the chance to constantly test themselves in the crucible of combat. And I think this very different outlook on life really comes through when playing the army on the tabletop.” The limited-edition Northkin Force Box is available for $109.99 MSRP and contains an eight-page Northkin Primer, which introduces players to the theme force background and rules. As with all theme force releases, the Northkin Forces is being further supported in the all-new No Quarter Prime magazine, launching alongside of the Northkin Theme Force in November. No Quarter Prime #2 (street date November 22) includes an extensive feature covering in depth the history, culture, and warrior traditions of the Northkin. The theme force feature also includes the rules for the theme force, all-new scenarios and game-modifying rules inspired by the theme force, and a squad list that allows players to play the theme in Company of Iron, Privateer Press’s brand-new skirmish game for WARMACHINE and HORDES, which was released in October of this year. The Northkin models and army box are available now from Privateer Press and local game stores. About Privateer Press, Inc. Privateer Press, Inc., is a privately held producer of entertainment and hobby brands based in the Seattle area. Its products include the award-winning WARMACHINE and HORDES hobby miniatures games, the award-winning Iron Kingdoms property and Iron Kingdoms Full Metal Fantasy Roleplaying Game, the Monsterpocalypse battle miniatures game, the Formula P3 hobby line, No Quarter Prime magazine, and digital fiction through the Skull Island eXpeditions imprint. LEVEL 7 is the property of Matthew D. Wilson, used under license. To learn more about Privateer Press, visit www.privateerpress.com or contact the president, Sherry Yeary, at (425) 643-5900 or sherry@privateerpress.com. About WARMACHINE and HORDES WARMACHINE and HORDES are dynamic, 32 mm tabletop miniatures games set in the steam-powered science-fiction/fantasy world of the Iron Kingdoms. WARMACHINE and HORDES use the same rules and can be played independently or against each other, differing in the range of Factions available in each game and the manner in which each side wages war. In WARMACHINE, the player commands an army of detailed miniatures, including a warcaster, an elite soldier-sorcerer who possesses arcane power and the ability to mentally control steam-powered mechanical automatons known as warjacks, and supporting soldiers. In HORDES, the player commands a battle mage, known as a warlock, who can control an army of powerful warbeasts and lead warriors into combat. No View the full article
  9. The game of gang warfare in the twisted depths of an industrial underworld is back! With a new edition of Necromunda available to pre-order very soon, Black Library wanted to get in on the underhive action, so it seems the perfect time to re-release a load of classic Necromunda fiction – in snazzy paperback editions sporting classic cover art updated to carry the new game logo. For a limited time, six novels, a short story anthology and two graphic novels will be available to order in print-on-demand paperback editions. What does this mean? Well, when you order one of these titles, it will be printed for you and sent out to you. This means that it might take a bit longer than usual for them to get to you, but you’ll be rewarded with tales of adventure and horror from the depths of Hive Primus. So what titles are coming? Here’s the rundown: ‘Status: Deadzone’ is an anthology of 11 stories covering treasure hunts, gang clashes and much more – including a tale by fan favourite Warhammer 40,000 author Matthew Farrer! And there’s more from Farrer with ‘Junktion’, in which control of a struggling township’s power supply becomes dangerous for its owner. White Dwarf editor Matt Keefe’s ‘Outlander’ sees a mysterious stranger shake up a small settlement – but is he what he seems? ‘Back from the Dead’ by Salamanders author Nick Kyme has a former lawman caught up in a plague zombie infestation, who finds that he has enemies even more dangerous than the walking dead. ‘Fleshworks’ by Lucien Soulban and C S Goto’s ‘Salvation’ are both tales of quests into the underhive, the former in search of rare augmetics – which are still in use by their current owners! – and the latter to find an ancient artefact that could change the fortunes of the one who owns it. Andy Chambers’ ‘Survival Instinct’ is a tale of one of Necromunda’s infamous anti-heroes, the psychopathic “Mad Donna” Ulanti, in a tale that could reveal her origins, if she can stop killing people for long enough to discover the truth! Another infamous rogue of the underhive takes centre stage in ‘The Redeemer’, a collection of a classic comics series telling the full tale of one of the Cult of the Red Redemption’s foremost followers. There’s more graphic novel action in ‘Kal Jerico: Underhive Bounty Hunter’, which collects all four volumes of the original comics about the underhive’s most beloved (by himself) bounty hunter. But what about the Kal Jerico novels? Well, they’re not included in the print-on-demand titles… because they’re being released in a brand new and shiny omnibus edition! ‘Kal Jerico: The Omnibus’ brings together three novels by Will McDermott and Gordon Rennie, telling a trio of feature-length tales of Kal and his associates Scabbs and Yolanda. All of these titles will be available to order on Saturday – and there will also be some bundles available if you want all the print-on-demand titles, or want to download the eBooks and get reading straight away. Check out blacklibrary.com this Saturday to see the full offer. The post Necromunda – Classic Stories in New Editions appeared first on Warhammer Community. View the full article
  10. A few more morsels of what lies ahead from the folks at Privateer Press showed up this week on social media. View the full article
  11. Building on their armies of the Horus Heresy the folks at Forge World has shown off the coming Varagyr Terminators who would have fought alongside Leman Russ in his many battles. View the full article
  12. With Aristeia! now available for Pre-Order from Corvus Belli they are looking ahead to the first expansion for the game, the Soldiers Of Fortune. View the full article
  13. Making a great looking army isn’t just about painting – converting is an effective way to add some variety to your force, as well as ensuring that multiples of the same model look distinct and interesting. For today’s Mind of Mengel, we’re looking at how Tyler approached one of the most ambitious conversions in his collection – an extensive re-pose of a Mourngul: Almost every army has at least one awesome model that you know you want to include one of in your forces; maybe the Hellpit Abomination for Skaven or the Stardrake for Stormcast Eternals. What do you do, though, when you want to have two of these in your army? They’re awesome models, but often are meant to be built in just one pose. You can paint them slightly different to help distinguish them, or if you really want to take the plunge, you can break out your hobby knives and Green Stuff and get to work. This is the exact situation I found myself in with my Nighthaunts. For my list, I decided I wanted to include two of the terrifyingly awesome Mournguls from Forge World, but the ghostly beast only comes in one pose. After looking over the model, and comparing it to the one I had already completed and painted, I came up with a plan of attack. It’s important, before starting a potentially complicated conversion like this, to have an idea of what you want to change beforehand. I messed around with some images on my computer, cutting and pasting pictures of the model in different poses and drawing quick doodles. My original idea may have been a bit overly ambitious, but it did give me some good ideas to work off of. Once I had the model in hand, I came up with a few things that were musts for me. Firstly, I knew I wanted to change the pose of its upraised arm, since this was pretty distinctive, and also easier to convert since it was away from the bulk of the model and wouldn’t involve cutting it away from anything. Secondly, I wanted to remove the horse from its other hand. I had taken the horse out of the first model as well, since it just doesn’t fit with the basing on the rest of my army. For this second Mourngul, though, I wanted to make sure I took care of it in a different way. For the upraised arm, I settled on simply lowering it and changing the angle slightly. This creates a pretty different silhouette for the model. Taking a hobby knife and some clippers, I cut away and trimmed the shoulder joint on the arm until it was rounded. There is a natural join in the model here, so it wasn’t too difficult. I then started hacking away at the shoulder joint on the body side of the model. This involved a little more work, and it took a few times dry-fitting the arm into the new socket before I was happy with the result. Once I had both sides of the join trimmed in such a way that I could reposition the arm lower and still have the anatomy look natural (or as natural as a sentient spectral mass of soul-hunger can), I pinned it in place using a Citadel Drill and a paperclip. Taking some Green Stuff, I filled the new gap between the arm and body, making sure to follow the musculature already sculpted on the model, but adjusting it slightly to account for the new pose on the arm. Once this main gap-filling was hardened, I went back over it with a thinner layer of Green Stuff to match all of the details to the skin already sculpted, and smooth out the join between resin and Green Stuff, so it was seamless. Lastly, for the arm, I turned the hand slightly at the wrist. This required minimal cutting of the wrist to get the new angle to match up, as well as a tiny bit of gap filling with Green Stuff. For the horse, I hacked away at it until everything that wasn’t covered by the Mourngul’s hand was gone. I then cut the bottom of it flat at the angle I wanted to glue the Mourngul to his base. Then I simply sculpted over this to look like a large rock, with a few other large rocks added to other areas on the base to tie it all together. Once this was all done, I decided I needed to change the face a bit. I thought about cutting off all of its hair, or cutting off its jaw and resculpting it, but in the end, I went for the simpler solution – adding a bit more hair on. Using Green Stuff again, I pushed its hairline forward a bit more and tried my best to replicate the sculpting style used on the rest of its hair. Now my Mourngul was ready for paint! Once all painted up, using all the same techniques I used in my Hexwraith tutorial, it was ready for the tabletop with a distinctively different look from its ghostly twin. This model was resin, which is a little different to work with from plastic, but the good news is that a plastic model is even easier to cut up and convert than resin! So just remember, whether you’re adding in several Gargants to an orruk horde, or have two Spirits of Durthu stomping around the woods, with a little ingenuity, a hobby knife, and some Green Stuff, you can put your own spin on the monster to make each one it’s own unique creation. Thanks Tyler! If you’re thinking of attempting a conversion on a Forge World model for yourself, make sure to check out Duncan’s guide to working with Forge World resin. Meanwhile, if you fancy a Mourngul of your own, you can order one today from Forge World. The post Making the Most of a Mourngul appeared first on Warhammer Community. View the full article
  14. Making a great looking army isn’t just about painting – converting is an effective way to add some variety to your force, as well as ensuring that multiples of the same model look distinct and interesting. For today’s Mind of Mengel, we’re looking at how Tyler approached one of the most ambitious conversions in his collection – an extensive re-pose of a Mourngul: Almost every army has at least one awesome model that you know you want to include one of in your forces; maybe the Hellpit Abomination for Skaven or the Stardrake for Stormcast Eternals. What do you do, though, when you want to have two of these in your army? They’re awesome models, but often are meant to be built in just one pose. You can paint them slightly different to help distinguish them, or if you really want to take the plunge, you can break out your hobby knives and Green Stuff and get to work. This is the exact situation I found myself in with my Nighthaunts. For my list, I decided I wanted to include two of the terrifyingly awesome Mournguls from Forge World, but the ghostly beast only comes in one pose. After looking over the model, and comparing it to the one I had already completed and painted, I came up with a plan of attack. It’s important, before starting a potentially complicated conversion like this, to have an idea of what you want to change beforehand. I messed around with some images on my computer, cutting and pasting pictures of the model in different poses and drawing quick doodles. My original idea may have been a bit overly ambitious, but it did give me some good ideas to work off of. Once I had the model in hand, I came up with a few things that were musts for me. Firstly, I knew I wanted to change the pose of its upraised arm, since this was pretty distinctive, and also easier to convert since it was away from the bulk of the model and wouldn’t involve cutting it away from anything. Secondly, I wanted to remove the horse from its other hand. I had taken the horse out of the first model as well, since it just doesn’t fit with the basing on the rest of my army. For this second Mourngul, though, I wanted to make sure I took care of it in a different way. For the upraised arm, I settled on simply lowering it and changing the angle slightly. This creates a pretty different silhouette for the model. Taking a hobby knife and some clippers, I cut away and trimmed the shoulder joint on the arm until it was rounded. There is a natural join in the model here, so it wasn’t too difficult. I then started hacking away at the shoulder joint on the body side of the model. This involved a little more work, and it took a few times dry-fitting the arm into the new socket before I was happy with the result. Once I had both sides of the join trimmed in such a way that I could reposition the arm lower and still have the anatomy look natural (or as natural as a sentient spectral mass of soul-hunger can), I pinned it in place using a Citadel Drill and a paperclip. Taking some Green Stuff, I filled the new gap between the arm and body, making sure to follow the musculature already sculpted on the model, but adjusting it slightly to account for the new pose on the arm. Once this main gap-filling was hardened, I went back over it with a thinner layer of Green Stuff to match all of the details to the skin already sculpted, and smooth out the join between resin and Green Stuff, so it was seamless. Lastly, for the arm, I turned the hand slightly at the wrist. This required minimal cutting of the wrist to get the new angle to match up, as well as a tiny bit of gap filling with Green Stuff. For the horse, I hacked away at it until everything that wasn’t covered by the Mourngul’s hand was gone. I then cut the bottom of it flat at the angle I wanted to glue the Mourngul to his base. Then I simply sculpted over this to look like a large rock, with a few other large rocks added to other areas on the base to tie it all together. Once this was all done, I decided I needed to change the face a bit. I thought about cutting off all of its hair, or cutting off its jaw and resculpting it, but in the end, I went for the simpler solution – adding a bit more hair on. Using Green Stuff again, I pushed its hairline forward a bit more and tried my best to replicate the sculpting style used on the rest of its hair. Now my Mourngul was ready for paint! Once all painted up, using all the same techniques I used in my Hexwraith tutorial, it was ready for the tabletop with a distinctively different look from its ghostly twin. This model was resin, which is a little different to work with from plastic, but the good news is that a plastic model is even easier to cut up and convert than resin! So just remember, whether you’re adding in several Gargants to an orruk horde, or have two Spirits of Durthu stomping around the woods, with a little ingenuity, a hobby knife, and some Green Stuff, you can put your own spin on the monster to make each one it’s own unique creation. Thanks Tyler! If you’re thinking of attempting a conversion on a Forge World model for yourself, make sure to check out Duncan’s guide to working with Forge World resin. Meanwhile, if you fancy a Mourngul of your own, you can order one today from Forge World. The post Making the Most of a Mourngul appeared first on Warhammer Community. View the full article
  15. This week’s Rumour Engine has us all abuzz – can you tell what it is? Let us know on the Warhammer 40,000 and Warhammer Age of Sigmar Facebook pages. The post The Rumour Engine – 7th November, 2017 appeared first on Warhammer Community. View the full article
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